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AGU Fall Meeting 2022

Location
Chicago, United States
Dates
-
Working groups

AGU (American Geophysical Union) Fall Meeting is the most influential event in the world dedicated to the advancement of Earth and space sciences.

Logistics

Date: 12-16 December 2022
Venue: Chicago, Illinois and online

Description

Every year, AGU Fall Meeting convenes >25,000 attendees from 100+ countries to share research and network. Researchers, scientists, educators, students, policymakers, enthusiasts, journalists and communicators attend AGU Fall Meeting to better understand our planet and environment, and our role in preserving its future. It is a results-oriented gathering rooted in celebrating and advancing positive individual and collective outcomes.

AGU Fall Meeting 2022 will be held in Chicago and online everywhere 12 - 16 December 2022. More than 25,000 attendees from more than 100 countries will convene to explore how Science Leads the Future. We will welcome a diverse community of scientists, students, journalists, policymakers, educators and organizations who are working toward a world where scientific discovery leads to scientific solutions, and where our global collaborations and partnerships can carry us into a sustainable future.

The theme is "Science leads the future".

Schedule

For the full schedule, please visit the website: https://www.agu.org/Fall-Meeting/Pages/Schedule-Events

Further information

Go to the official website: https://www.agu.org/Fall-Meeting

PAGES sessions

i. 2k Network
Session PP56A-05 - Announcing Phase 4 of PAGES 2k: Hydroclimate of the Common Era
Convenors: Alyssa R. Atwood, Oliver Bothe, Georgy Falster, Matthew Jones, Nikita Kaushal, Hans W Linderholm, Helen V Mcgregor, Steven J. Phipps, Sarah Eggleston, Benjamin Henley, Lukas Jonkers, Bronwen L Konecky, Belen Martrat, Anais Orsi, Hussein Sayani

Abstract: The climate of the past two millennia (2k) is vital for developing our understanding of the climate system, as it extends the historical climate record and provides context for recent and future changes. Building on previous phases of the PAGES 2k network, Phase 4 will pave the way for a new level of understanding of the global water cycle and enhanced science-policy integration. Previous phases of the PAGES 2k Network, emphasizing temperature reconstructions, fundamentally improved our understanding of global climate changes over the Common Era. These reconstructions received widespread recognition and were featured in the Summary for Policymakers of the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report. Integration of this data with state-of-the-art Earth systems models, proxy system models and data assimilation yielded a more comprehensive understanding of the associated physical drivers and climate dynamics.

Phase 4, which began in early 2022, will take us even further, challenging our community to turn its focus primarily towards the hydroclimate of the Common Era. Our overarching aim is to reconstruct hydroclimate variability over the Common Era from local to global spatial scales, at sub-annual to multi-centennial time scales, developing a process-level understanding of past hydroclimate events and variability. Our multi-faceted approach includes (1) developing new hydroclimate reconstructions that are well-suited for data-model comparisons, (2) improving the interoperability and scope of our data and model products, and (3) facilitating the translation of our science into evidence-based policy outcomes. Our coordination team places a strong emphasis on respect and inclusion, aiming to foster a diverse and equitable community. We are actively seeking participation from the research community as well as those engaged in climate policy and climate services. In this talk, we report on our activities and progress to date, and highlight opportunities to get involved in Phase 4.

ii. 2k Network
CoralHydro2k
Session PP23A-01 - Uncovering 'Hidden' Insights from the Ocean in the PAGES CoralHydro2k Seawater δ18O Database 
Invited
Convenors: Alyssa R. Atwood, Kristine L DeLong, Andrea L. Moore, Sara C Sanchez, Amy J Wagner, Thomas Felis, Sylvia Long

Abstract: The oxygen isotope ratio (δ18O) of seawater is a powerful tracer of the global water cycle, providing valuable information on the exchange of water between the ocean, atmosphere, and cryosphere as well as on ocean mixing processes. As such, observational seawater δ18O data place powerful constraints on hydrologic changes in the modern ocean, are essential for calibrating paleoclimate proxies based on the δ18O of marine carbonates, and are an increasingly critical diagnostic tool for assessing model performance and skill in isotope-enabled global climate models. In recognition of the broad value of seawater δ18O data to the Earth science community and the growing number of new seawater δ18O data sets that have been generated over the last decade, we launched the PAGES CoralHydro2k Seawater δ18O Database Project in 2020 to recover ‘hidden’ seawater oxygen isotope data sets. We are collating these records in a new, machine-readable, and metadata-rich database that aligns with findability, accessibility, interoperability, and reusability (FAIR) standards for digital assets.

Here, we present a summary of our crowdsourcing efforts and description of the database to date, and report initial findings from the new database. Our compilation reveals the sparse distribution of surface seawater δ18O observations in both space and time. At select sites, we compare seawater δ18O variability from observational data in our database to that simulated by a suite of isotope-enabled climate models and to seawater δ18O reconstructions derived from coral records. We find substantial differences in seawater δ18O variability at annual to decadal timescales across different data sets and we contextualize these discrepancies in terms of their respective strengths and limitations. Lastly, we discuss the potential for future investments in water isotope observation networks to tackle 21st century science questions related to ocean changes in the past, present, and future.
 

iii. C-PEAT - Carbon in Peat on Earth through Time 
Session B31A - Carbon Cycling in Global Peatlands
Online Poster Discussion
Convenors: Torben R Christensen, Oliver Sonnentag, Julie Loisel, Nicole K Sanderson (ECC) 

Abstract: In this session, we invite the global peatland community to present their research on the carbon cycle in intact and degraded peatlands across latitudes. Studies from a wide range of global peatlands, including arctic, boreal, temperate and tropical peatlands are welcome. We encourage studies including but not limited to laboratory and field experiments, flux measurements, remote sensing, microbial ecology, paleoecological studies and process-based or large-scale modeling. Efforts to understand current dynamics as well as studies exploring the past, present and future natural peatland responses to climate as well as to land use change are welcome.

iv. C-PEAT - Carbon in Peat on Earth through Time 
Session B32C - 1378 - C-PEAT’s Paleo Proxy Database (v.1.0.)
In-person poster
Convenors: Nicole K Sanderson(ECC), Julie Loisel, Angela V Gallego-Sala, Kendahl Hejl, Daniel Maraldo

Abstract:Improving predictions about recent past, present, and future peatland carbon and water dynamics is necessary to forecast feedbacks to the global carbon cycle, and to help inform land policy and resource management decisions. With growing interest in peat ecosystems as nature-based climate solutions and globally important carbon sinks, understanding the sensitivity of peat proxies to environmental drivers is important to predict the future peatland carbon response. Paleoecological data, which record past temperature and ecohydrological changes, can provide empirical limits for the rates of change and range of natural variability in peatlands.
We present a compilation of peat-based paleoclimatic proxy datasets from around the globe. This is an effort that has been undertaken by PAGES’ C-PEAT working group. These datasets include chronologically constrained testate amoebae, plant macrofossil, and geochemical records as well as novel proxies such as biomarkers and stable isotopes. The Paleo Proxy database will be available for community use on Neotoma, and we aim to continue to expand its contents in order to improve process-based models, and to to track how these proxies get encoded in peat layers over time. This new C-PEAT database will be used to assess ecosystem responses to past environmental drivers, including recovery from past abrupt changes in water table depth and temperature, as well as building carbon trajectories. With this new knowledge, we aim to demonstrate the robustness of peat stratigraphy as paleoenvironmental archives that can be integrated with other terrestrial records (e.g., lake sediments, tree rings) in regional paleoclimate reconstructions.

v. C-PEAT - Carbon in Peat on Earth through Time 
Session B35B - Carbon Cycling in Global Peatlands III 
Oral
Convenors: Torben R Christensen, Oliver Sonnentag, Julie Loisel, Efrén López-Blanco, Nicole K Sanderson (ECC)

Abstract: In this session, we invite the global peatland community to present their research on the carbon cycle in intact and degraded peatlands across latitudes. Studies from a wide range of global peatlands, including arctic, boreal, temperate and tropical peatlands are welcome. We encourage studies including but not limited to laboratory and field experiments, flux measurements, remote sensing, microbial ecology, paleoecological studies and process-based or large-scale modeling. Efforts to understand current dynamics as well as studies exploring the past, present and future natural peatland responses to climate as well as to land use change are welcome.

vi. C-PEAT - Carbon in Peat on Earth through Time 
Session B36B - Carbon Cycling in Global Peatlands IV 
Oral
Convenors: Oliver Sonnentag, Julie Loisel, Nicole K Sanderson (ECC)

Abstract: In this session, we invite the global peatland community to present their research on the carbon cycle in intact and degraded peatlands across latitudes. Studies from a wide range of global peatlands, including arctic, boreal, temperate and tropical peatlands are welcome. We encourage studies including but not limited to laboratory and field experiments, flux measurements, remote sensing, microbial ecology, paleoecological studies and process-based or large-scale modeling. Efforts to understand current dynamics as well as studies exploring the past, present and future natural peatland responses to climate as well as to land use change are welcome.

vii. SISAL - Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and AnaLysis
Session PP22A-08 - SISAL Speleothem Database Updates - Link to Monitoring Data, Additional Proxies and Increased Accessibility
Convenors: Yuval Burstyn, Kira Rehfeld, Franziska Lechleitner, Peter Tanos, Kerstin Braun, Yassine Ait Brahim, Nikita Kaushal, Micah Wilhelm, Istvan Gabor Hatvani, Zoltan Kern, Andy Baker

Abstract: Speleothem archives (cave carbonates) are widely distributed in terrestrial regions, and provide highly resolved records of past changes in climate and vegetation, encoded in the oxygen and carbon isotope proxies. The SISALv2 database, created by the PAGES-SISAL Phase 1 Working Group, provided 700 speleothem records from 293 cave sites, 500 of which have standardized chronologies. The database provides access to records that were hitherto unavailable in the original publications and/or repositories, and has enabled regional-to-global scale analysis of climatic patterns using a variety of approaches such as data-model comparisons.
The PAGES-SISAL Phase 2 Working Group is a continuation of the previous efforts to index speleothem datasets, focusing on the following objectives: (i) exploring ways to synthesize modern cave monitoring data to provide robust modern baselines and improve proxy interpretations, (ii) adding trace element proxies of Mg, Sr, Ba, U, and Sr isotopes to the SISAL database to increase our understanding of regional climatic variability, (iii) a database-update to incorporate ~100 identified speleothem datasets that are currently not in the database, (iv) providing a javascript web app with a user-friendly GUI to increase SISAL data accessibility.

Here, we present: (i) ongoing work synthesizing cave monitoring data, (ii) summarize speleothem proxy records available in the SISALv3 database update and highlight ongoing Working Group research projects and (iii) introduce the Beta version of the SISAL GUI. We briefly present a synopsis of the SISAL-community level discussions on best practices for reporting trace element data, and reducing data measured with high resolution laser ablation methods.

We welcome feedback on PAGES-SISAL Phase 2 activities listed above, and encourage participation and collaboration from interested researchers in different stages of their academic career and working in different geographical regions and allied disciplines.

viii. VICS - Volcanic Impacts on Climate and Society
Session: A13C - Climatic, Environmental and Societal Impacts of Volcanic Eruptions II 
Oral
Convenors: Davide Zanchettin, Francesco S.R. Pausat, Matthew Toohey, Lauren Marshall (ECC)

Abstract: Volcanic eruptions can significantly alter the Earth's radiation budget and cause climate perturbations on interannual to multidecadal time scales. Ultimately, they may influence the biosphere and local and regional environments as well as societies. Our understanding of volcanic impacts on climate remains hampered by the paucity of observed eruptions, uncertainties in volcanic forcing datasets, limitations of proxy-based climate evidence, uncertainties of global aerosol model simulations and inconsistencies of responses across climate models. Also, how volcanic forcing will affect future climates remains uncertain. This session aims at bringing together researchers studying the impact of volcanic eruptions on climate variability and predictability by means of observations, climate reconstruction studies, and modeling. We aim to highlight contributions conducted under the umbrella of CMIP6, especially the VolMIP and PMIP4 activities, contributions aligned with the PAGES-VICS working group and with the SPARC SSiRC activity.

ix. VICS - Volcanic Impacts on Climate and Society
Session: A11E - Climatic, Environmental and Societal Impacts of Volcanic Eruptions I
Online Poster Discussion
Convenors: Davide Zanchettin, Francesco S.R. Pausat, Matthew Toohey, Lauren Marshall (ECC)

Abstract:Volcanic eruptions can significantly alter the Earth's radiation budget and cause climate perturbations on interannual to multidecadal time scales. Ultimately, they may influence the biosphere and local and regional environments as well as societies. Our understanding of volcanic impacts on climate remains hampered by the paucity of observed eruptions, uncertainties in volcanic forcing datasets, limitations of proxy-based climate evidence, uncertainties of global aerosol model simulations and inconsistencies of responses across climate models. Also, how volcanic forcing will affect future climates remains uncertain. This session aims at bringing together researchers studying the impact of volcanic eruptions on climate variability and predictability by means of observations, climate reconstruction studies, and modeling. We aim to highlight contributions conducted under the umbrella of CMIP6, especially the VolMIP and PMIP4 activities, contributions aligned with the PAGES-VICS working group and with the SPARC SSiRC activity.

x. VICS - Volcanic Impacts on Climate and Society
Session: A15H - Climatic, Environmental and Societal Impacts of Volcanic Eruptions III
Poster
Convenors: Davide Zanchettin, Francesco S.R. Pausat, Matthew Toohey, Lauren Marshall (ECC)

Abstract: Volcanic eruptions can significantly alter the Earth's radiation budget and cause climate perturbations on interannual to multidecadal time scales. Ultimately, they may influence the biosphere and local and regional environments as well as societies. Our understanding of volcanic impacts on climate remains hampered by the paucity of observed eruptions, uncertainties in volcanic forcing datasets, limitations of proxy-based climate evidence, uncertainties of global aerosol model simulations and inconsistencies of responses across climate models. Also, how volcanic forcing will affect future climates remains uncertain. This session aims at bringing together researchers studying the impact of volcanic eruptions on climate variability and predictability by means of observations, climate reconstruction studies, and modeling. We aim to highlight contributions conducted under the umbrella of CMIP6, especially the VolMIP and PMIP4 activities, contributions aligned with the PAGES-VICS working group and with the SPARC SSiRC activity.

Talks from SSC members and working group leaders/ECN representatives

Raphaël Hébert (CVAS) Session NG25A - 40 Years of Atmospheric Scaling: From Clouds to Climate Variability Across Scales I Oral

Aixue Hu: Session A42H - Extratropical and High-Latitude Storms, Teleconnections, and Extreme Events in the Context of Air-Ice-Sea Interactions and Rapidly Changing Polar Climate I Oral 

Aixue Hu: Session A43D-04 - Impact of tropical cyclone winds on ENSO (Paper)

Aixue Hu: Session A51E - Extratropical and High-Latitude Storms, Teleconnections, and Extreme Events in the Context of Air-Ice-Sea Interactions and Rapidly Changing Polar Climate II Online Poster Discussion

Aixue Hu: Session A52L - Extratropical and High-Latitude Storms, Teleconnections, and Extreme Events in the Context of Air-Ice-Sea Interactions and Rapidly Changing Polar Climate III Poster

Aixue Hu: Session A55F - Extratropical and High-Latitude Storms, Teleconnections, and Extreme Events in the Context of Air-Ice-Sea Interactions and Rapidly Changing Polar Climate IV Oral

Bronwen L Konecky & Georgy Falster (2k Network) Session PP25B-01 - Regional To Global Hydroclimate Responses To Forced Temperature Changes During The Past 2,000 Years (Invited)

M. Eugenia Ferrero: Session GC21A-02 - New insights in quantitative wood anatomy and radiocarbon dating as complementary methodologies to study tree species from the Central tropical Andes.

M. Eugenia Ferrero: Session GC25B-06 - Climate Impacts on the Radial Growth of Tree Species in the Bolivian Amazon

Fabrice Lambert: Session B25A-05 - Regulation of last glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 by sea iron solubility in an Earth system model

Pradeep Srivastava: Session PP12C-0653 - First evidence of paleo wildfire records from Trans Himalaya vis-à-vis climate and human intervention (Paper)

Pradeep Srivastava: Session PP24B-01 - Decoding the Extreme Events of Siang-Brahmaputra Basin (Paper)

Paul Valdes: Session EP42B-03 - Modelling 540 million years of dust emission with GCM and dust model 

Paul Valdes: Session PP53A-03 - Global Synthesis of Regional Holocene Hydroclimate Variability Using Proxy and Model Data

Paul Valdes: Session PP53A-04 - Reconstructing Holocene temperatures – Using data assimilation to explore Holocene climate in space and time