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EGU General Assembly 2023 - Vienna, Austria

Location
Vienna, Austria
Dates
-
Working groups

Logistics

Date: 23-28 April 2023
Location: Vienna, Austria & Online

Description

The European Geosciences Union (EGU) is the leading organisation for Earth, planetary and space science research in Europe. With our partner organisations worldwide, we foster fundamental geoscience research, alongside applied research that addresses key societal and environmental challenges. Our vision is to realise a sustainable and just future for humanity and for the planet.

It is a non-profit international union of scientists with about 18,000 members from all over the world. Membership is open to individuals who are professionally engaged in or associated with geosciences and planetary and space sciences and related studies, including students and retired seniors.

The EGU publishes a number of diverse scientific journals, which use an innovative open access format, and organises topical meetings, and education and outreach activities. It also honours scientists with a number of awards and medals. The annual EGU General Assembly is the largest and most prominent European geosciences event, attracting over 18,000 scientists from all over the world in the year 2021. The meeting’s sessions cover a wide range of topics, including volcanology, planetary exploration, the Earth’s internal structure and atmosphere, climate, as well as energy and resources.

The EGU was established in September 2002 as a merger of the European Geophysical Society (EGS) and the European Union of Geosciences (EUG), and has headquarters in Munich, Germany.

Venue

Austria Center Vienna

Description

The General Assembly 2022 of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) will be held at the Austria Center Vienna (ACV) in Vienna, Austria, from 23-28 April 2023. The assembly is open to scientists of all nations. The entire congress centre is fully accessible by wheelchairs.

Registration/Deadlines

The EGU23 call-for-abstracts will open on 1 November 2022.
The abstract submission deadline is 10 January 2023, 13:00 CET.

For General information, registration, and submission of abstracts, please email: info@egu.eu

PAGES working group sessions

2k Network

CL1.2.4 - Studying the climate of the last two millennia
Co-sponsored by PAGES 2k
Convener: Andrea Seim
Co-conveners: Hugo Beltrami, Stefan Brönnimann, Nikita Kaushal, Steven Phipps

This session aims to place recently observed climate change in a long-term perspective by highlighting the importance of paleoclimate research spanning the past 2000 years. We invite presentations that provide insights into past climate variability, over decadal to millennial timescales, from different paleoclimate archives (ice cores, marine sediments, terrestrial records, historical archives and more). In particular, we are focussing on quantitative temperature and hydroclimate reconstructions, and reconstructions of large-scale modes of climate variability from local to global scales. This session also encourages presentations on the attribution of past climate variability to external drivers or internal climate processes, data syntheses, model-data comparison exercises, proxy system modelling, and novel approaches to producing multi-proxy climate field reconstructions such as data assimilation or machine learning.

NP3.1 - Climate Variability Across Scales
Co-organized by CL4, co-sponsored by PAGES 2k
Convener: Raphael Hébert
Co-conveners: Sylvia G. Dee, Shaun Lovejoy

We welcome contributions that improve quantification, understanding, and prediction of climate variability in the Earth system across space and timescales through case studies, idealized or realistic modeling, synthesis, and model-data comparison studies that provide insights into past, present and future climate variability on local to global, and synoptic to orbital timescales. In particular, we welcome contributions making use of paleoclimate data and modelling to understand changes in the climate system dynamics and variability during the last glacial cycle, and the related implications for the future.

This session aims to provide a forum to present work on:
1. Characterization of climate dynamics using a variety of techniques (e.g. scaling and multifractal techniques and models, recurrence plots, variance analyses).
2. Proxy-system modelling to improve paleoclimate reconstructions and model-data comparisons
3. Relationship between mean state changes (e.g. glacial to interglacial or pre-industrial to present to future), and higher-order moments of relevant climate variables, including extreme-event occurrence and predictability.
4. Role of the ocean, atmosphere, cryosphere and land-surface processes in fostering long-term climate variability through linear – or nonlinear – feedbacks and mechanisms.
5. Attribution of climate variability to internal and/or forced dynamics, including natural (e.g. volcanic and solar) and anthropogenic forcing changes.
6. Synchronization and pacing of glacial cycles through dynamical interaction of external forcing (e.g. orbital forcing) and internal variability.
7. Characterization of the probabilities of extremes, including linkage between slow climate variability and extreme event recurrence.
Members of the PAGES working group on Climate Variability Across Scales (CVAS) and the German Climate Modeling Initiative PalMod are particularly welcome.

Disentangling climate and pre-industrial human impacts on marine ecosystems (Q-MARE)

SSP1.12 - Continental shelf ecosystems through time 
Convener: Danae Thivaiou 
Co-conveners: Alex Dunhill, Konstantina Agiadi, Baran Karapunar, Devapriya Chattopadhyay

Continental shelves cover more than 32 million square kilometres worldwide today and are home to many marine organisms. At the interface between the deep oceans and the continents, shelves are characterised by high nutrient and energy exchange rates, and are directly impacted by the change in climate. They constitute an arena where sedimentological processes interfere with marine biota. Continental shelves host the largest part of the ocean’s marine biodiversity in recent and deep time. Hence, they offer interesting opportunities for tracing changes in the environment and their impacts on biodiversity through time. This session aims to bring together scientists working on marine fossils and the sedimentological processes that have shaped life on the continental shelf. We welcome contributions on all aspects of the evolution of past shelf ecosystems including biotic crises related with perturbations in climate, sedimentary regime and carbon cycle, diversification events, biotic interactions (e.g., predator-prey and parasitic interactions, food webs). We invite presentations on the fields of palaeontology, paleobiology, palaeoecology, palaeobiogeography, taphonomy, facies analysis and sedimentology.

PAGES Early-Career Network

CL1.7 Past vegetation dynamics and their impact on climate change 
Convener: Manuel Chevalier, Anne Dallmeyer, Nils Weitzel, Anneli Poska
Co-organized: BG5

Changes in the global vegetation distribution not only affect the terrestrial carbon cycle but also influence the global climate by modifying the physical properties of the land surface and the strength of the interactions with the atmosphere. Understanding past, present and future vegetation dynamics and their role in the climate system are thus of utmost importance. The availability of large-scale vegetation reconstructions and the growing ability to perform long-term transient and sophisticated time-slice simulations with Earth system models now allow increasingly detailed analyses of the large-scale vegetation transitions in the past and their effect on climate. In this session, we want to discuss the latest developments at the interface between vegetation reconstructions, vegetation simulations, and data-model comparison tools.

We thus invite contributions to the broad theme of past vegetation dynamics and their interaction with climate. These include but are not limited to (a) vegetation simulations of various time intervals, (b) new large-scale data and reconstruction compilations, (c) data–model and inter-model comparison studies, (d) vegetation-climate dynamics inferred from models or compilations of vegetation records, (e) the influence of past land use and fire dynamics on vegetation and climate, and (f) progress in data–model comparison tools and techniques. Studies focusing on currently understudied regions are particularly welcome. This session is sponsored by the PalMod project (www.palmod.de).

Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and AnaLysis (SISAL)

CL1.2.2 - Speleothems, cave deposits, and karst records - Archives of Modern and Palaeoenvironmental Change
Co-organized by SSP3, co-sponsored by PAGES
Convener: Sophie Warken
Co-conveners: Nikita Kaushal, Gabriella Koltai, Vanessa Skiba, Laura Endres

Cave and karst formations such as speleothems, cave ice, cryogenic carbonate, sediments, tufa and travertines are important terrestrial archives of past environmental and climatic changes. They provide high resolution and accurately dated records using not only traditional geochemical tracers such as stable isotopes (d13C, d18O), trace elements, fluid inclusion analyses, or dead carbon fractions but also innovative methods such as organic markers or new paleothermometers. In recent years, the fields of cave and karst-based research has seen:
(1) Development of novel and innovative methods as well as continuously improving analytical capacity of established techniques allowing new applications also of traditional markers (e.g. combined multi-proxy approaches),
(2) Increasing numbers of long-term monitoring campaigns and cave-analogue experiments facilitating (quantitative) interpretation of proxy time series,
(3) Advancement of process and proxy-system models which are necessary to understand and disentangle proxy-relevant processes such as water infiltration, carbonate dissolution, degassing, precipitation, or diagenesis,
(4) The development and extensive use of databases such as SISAL (Speleothem Isotope Synthesis and AnaLysis) which enable regional-to-global and seasonal-to-orbital scale analyses of the relationships between proxies and environmental parameters,
Applied together, advancements in these cornerstones pave the way towards robust and quantitative reconstructions of climate and environmental variability. We invite cave- and karst-related modern and paleo studies to this session, which show progress in one of the four outlined domains. This comprises all integrated and interdisciplinary research helping to improve the understanding of the environment in which continental carbonates grow and the incorporation of climate-sensitive proxies at various time scales. In particular, this includes speleothem-based and other records using traditional proxies or novel markers and methods to reconstruct paleoclimate and paleoenvironment, data analysis studies and data-model comparisons. In addition, research contributing to current international co-ordinated activities, such as the PAGES working group on Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and AnaLysis (SISAL) and others are welcome.

Volcanic Impacts on Climate and Society (VICS) 

AS3.13  - Understanding volcano-climate impacts and the stratospheric aerosol layer
Convener: Davide Zanchettin
Co-conveners: Myriam Khodri, Graham Mann, Lauren Marshall, Shih-Wei Fang

Volcanic aerosol clouds from major tropical eruptions cause periods of strong surface cooling in the historical climate record and are dominant influences within decadal surface temperature trends. Advancing our understanding of the influence of volcanoes on climate relies upon better knowledge of (i) the radiative forcings of past eruptions and the microphysical, chemical and dynamical processes which affect the evolution of stratospheric aerosol properties and (ii) the response mechanisms governing post-eruption climate variability and their dependency on the climate state at the time of the eruption. This can only be achieved by combining information from satellite and in-situ observations of recent eruptions, stratospheric aerosol and climate modelling activities, and reconstructions of past volcanic histories and post-eruption climate state from proxies.

In recent years the smoke from intense wildfires in North America and Australia has also been an important component of the stratospheric aerosol layer, the presence of organic aerosol and meteoric particles in background conditions now also firmly established.

This session seeks presentations from research aimed at better understanding the stratospheric aerosol layer, its volcanic perturbations and the associated impacts on climate through the post-industrial period (1750-present) and also those further back in the historical record. Observational and model studies on the 2022 eruption of Hunga Tonga are especially welcomed.

We also welcome contributions to understand the societal impacts of volcanic eruptions and the human responses to them. Contributions addressing volcanic influences on atmospheric composition, such as changes in stratospheric water vapour, ozone and other trace gases are also encouraged.

The session aims to bring together research contributing to several current international co-ordinated activities: SPARC-SSiRC, CMIP6-VolMIP, CMIP6-PMIP, and PAGES-VICS.

PAGES-related sessions

CL1.7 Past vegetation dynamics and their impact on climate
Co-organized by BG5
Convener: Manuel Chevalier
Co-conveners: Anne Dallmeyer, Nils Weitzel, Anneli Poska

Changes in the global vegetation distribution not only affect the terrestrial carbon cycle but also influence the global climate by modifying the physical properties of the land surface and the strength of the interactions with the atmosphere. Understanding past, present and future vegetation dynamics and their role in the climate system are thus of utmost importance. The availability of large-scale vegetation reconstructions and the growing ability to perform long-term transient and sophisticated time-slice simulations with Earth system models now allow increasingly detailed analyses of the large-scale vegetation transitions in the past and their effect on climate. In this session, we want to discuss the latest developments at the interface between vegetation reconstructions, vegetation simulations, and data-model comparison tools.

We thus invite contributions to the broad theme of past vegetation dynamics and their interaction with climate. These include but are not limited to (a) vegetation simulations of various time intervals, (b) new large-scale data and reconstruction compilations, (c) data–model and inter–model comparison studies, (d) vegetation-climate dynamics inferred from models or compilations of vegetation records, (e) the influence of past land use and fire dynamics on vegetation and climate, and (f) progress in data–model comparison tools and techniques. Studies focusing on currently understudied regions are particularly welcome. This session is sponsored by the PalMod project (www.palmod.de).

CL5 - Geochronological tools for environmental reconstructions
Co-organized by GM2/SSP2, co-sponsored by PAGES
Co-conveners: Gina E. Moseley, Andreas Lang, Irka Hajdas
Convener: Arne Ramisch

The Quaternary Period (last 2.6 million years) is characterized by frequent and abrupt climate swings that were accompanied by rapid environmental change. Studying these changes requires accurate and precise dating methods that can be effectively applied to environmental archives. A range of different methods or a combination of various dating techniques can be used, depending on the archive, time range, and research question. Varve counting and dendrochronology allow for the construction of high-resolution chronologies, whereas radiometric methods (radiocarbon, cosmogenic in-situ, U-Th) and luminescence dating provide independent anchors for chronologies that span over longer timescales. We particularly welcome contributions that aim to (1) reduce, quantify and express dating uncertainties in any dating method, including high-resolution radiocarbon approaches; (2) use established geochronological methods to answer new questions; (3) use new methods to address longstanding issues, or; (4) combine different chronometric techniques for improved results, including the analysis of chronological datasets with novel methods, e.g. Bayesian age-depth modeling. Applications may aim to understand long-term landscape evolution, quantify rates of geomorphological processes, or provide chronologies for records of climate change.

CL4 - Tracking the Southern Hemisphere hydrographic frontal variability since the Pliocene
Co-conveners: Mariem Saavedra-Pellitero, Elisa Malinverno, Iván Hernández-Almeida
Convener: Deborah Tangunan

The Subtropical, Subantarctic,and the Polar Fronts play a key role in connecting the cryosphere-hydrosphere-biosphere-atmosphere and climate variability between high-and low-latitude regions. The relative position of these South Hemisphere (SH) hydrographic fronts, both in the past and the present, regulates ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange, deep-ocean carbon sequestration, and sea-ice extent, which have broad implications for the global climate. These hydrographic fronts are highly dynamic and shift positions in both short (seasonally) and longer timescales (thousands of years).

The late Neogene and the Quaternary is an interval of long-term cooling, but characterized by having several warmer than modern periods (e.g., warm Pliocene, “super interglacials” during the Late Pleistocene), which serve as analogues for the ongoing anthropogenic warming. During these intervals, it has been hypothesized that there was a large reorganization of the hydrographic and atmospheric fronts in the SH, which had consequences for ice-sheet build-up in Antarctica and ocean-atmosphere carbon cycling, with further implications for surface ocean dynamics and productivity. Characterization of these fronts using sedimentary records, located in mid-to-high latitudes in the SH allow us to understand the sensitivity and interconnection between Antarctic ice-sheets and carbon cycle to frontal shifts.

We encourage submissions of studies using quantitative or qualitative proxies (micropaleontological, geochemical, isotopic) sensitive to physical, chemical, and biological parameters for the surface ocean, as well as proxies for atmospheric changes, and proxy data assimilation. Ideally, sediment-based reconstructions should show orbital to millennial scale resolution in order to track shifts in frontal systems forced by different climatic processes. We target studies covering the last 5.3 Ma, particularly from (but not limited to) recent IODP sites in the SH (e.g., Expeditions 361, 382, 383) and legacy ODP sites (e.g., Expeditions 177, 189) drilled across these fronts, as well as modern studies (e.g., water, sediment trap, sediment core top samples) on multiple site transects in the SH.

ITS2.9/BG1.11 - Climate Extremes & Risk: Impacts, Cascades, Feedbacks with Biosphere and Society
Co-conveners: Dorothea Frank, Felix Riede, Jana Sillmann, Simron Singh
Convener: Markus Reichstein

Extreme climate and weather events, associated disasters and emergent risks are becoming increasingly critical in the context of global environmental change and interact with other stressors. They are a potential major threat to reaching the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and one of the most pressing challenges for future human well-being. This session explores the linkages between extreme climate and weather events, associated disasters, societal dynamics and resilience. Emphasis is laid on 1) Which impacts are caused by extreme climate events (including risks emerging from compound events) and cascades of impacts on various aspects of ecosystems and societies? 2) Which feedbacks across ecosystems, infrastructures and societies exist? 3) What are key obstacles towards societal resilience and reaching the SDGs, while facing climate extremes? 4) What can we learn from past experiences? 5) What local to global governance arrangements best support equitable and sustainable risk reduction? We welcome empirical, theoretical and modelling studies from local to global scale from the fields of natural sciences, social sciences, humanities and related disciplines.

EGU 2023 awards and medals

Hugues Goosse, a PAGES fellow who served on the PAGES Scientific Steering Committee from 2013-2018 will be receiving the Hans Oeschger Medal.

"This medal was established by the Climate: Past, Present & Future Division in recognition of the scientific achievement of Hans Oeschger. It is awarded to scientists for their outstanding achievements in ice research and/or short-term climatic changes (past, present, future)."

Bette L. Otto-Bliesner, a PAGES fellow, and PAGES Co-Chair from 2006-2011, will be receiving the Milutin Milankovic Medal.

"This medal was established by the Climate: Past, Present & Future Division in recognition of the scientific and editorial achievements of Milutin Milankovic. It is awarded to scientists for their outstanding research in long-term climatic changes and modelling."

Access the full list of EGU 2023 award recipients 

Further information

To check current updates or stay connected to social media visit: https://www.egu23.eu/.