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PhD Scholarship, Glacial Geology - Galway, Ireland

Galway, Ireland
Theme
Category
Logistics
Palaeoenvironmental Research Unit, Geography
University of Galway, Ireland
Living allowance (Stipend): €18,500 per annum, [tax-exempt scholarship award]
University fees: €5,500
Start date: 1st April 2023

Applications are invited from suitably qualified candidates for two full-time SFI-funded PhD scholarships starting in April 2023, hosted by the Discipline of Geography at the University of Galway and affiliated with the iCRAG SFI centre. Successful candidates will join Geography’s Palaeoenvironmental Research Unit (PRU).
Description
Climate change is the greatest existential threat to human stability and sustainability in the 21st Century, creating uncertainty and undermining basic societal foundations.
As a front-line tool for climate projection, the numerical models simulating future conditions are first ‘tested’ against proxy-based reconstructions of past climate events, such as the last glacial maximum (LGM), after which they are then tasked with replicating modern conditions and projecting future change. Current Northern Hemisphere parameters include air temperature, from ice core δ18O, and sea surface temperature (SST), from North Atlantic geochemical and biological proxies; terrestrial palaeoclimate data, in contrast, are not as widely implemented.
Moreover, traditional targets (e.g., LGM, Holocene) are long, steady-state periods with relatively gradual transitions. Today’s climate shifts are more rapid, reflecting the unprecedented rise in atmospheric CO2; more suitable calibration targets, therefore, are the abrupt climatic shifts evident in palaeoclimate records.

This project applies a coupled glacial-geologic–modelling approach to reconstruct the behaviour of terrestrial glaciers during key climatic events of the last ~30,000 years. As the physical expression of climate, glaciers have long been used to evaluate the timing/magnitude of past climate shifts and monitor modern warming. GeoPAC2 will empirically assess the sign and magnitude of glacial change in Ireland, as a unique indicator of North Atlantic summer temperature, during stadial/non-stadial states and the transitions between them, and use these data to refine PMIP model targets.

This field-based project involves ground-based geomorphic mapping of glacial deposits, construction of beryllium-10-dated moraine records, and numerical modelling. Project findings will be used to test the traditional view of abrupt climate change in the North Atlantic region and inform the next generation of predictive climate models.
Tasks
The two successful applicants will undertake geomorphic field mapping in formerly glaciated catchments throughout the West of Ireland and use cosmogenic-nuclide geochronology to reconstruct patterns of terrestrial temperature change during abrupt climate shifts.

The two successful applicants will undertake geomorphic and topographic surveys of formerly glaciated catchments throughout the West of Ireland and use these data to draft high-resolution GIS-based maps. They will collect rock samples from target moraine systems and along deglacial transects, and prepare samples for cosmogenic 10Be geochemistry at the University of Galway, with the potential for visits to project partners and collaborating labs. Both students will use MATLAB and GIS to reconstruct the temporal evolution of glacier equilibrium-line altitudes, and conduct glacier-climate modelling to derive likely temperature and precipitation scenarios from the geologic record. In addition to actively disseminating their research through publications and oral communications, they will contribute to the design of new palaeoclimate targets for climate models. This PhD position will be supervised by Dr Gordon Bromley (University of Galway).

Requirements
Applications are welcomed from individuals with a first-class or upper second-class honours/4-year degree in Earth sciences, Geology, or Physical Geography.

Essential Criteria

- Undergraduate and/or Post-graduate thesis in Glacial Geology, Quaternary Geomorphology, Terrestrial Palaeoclimate, or related field-based Physical Geography/Earth Science subjects.
- Strong track record of field-based research, including mapping.
- Academic Excellence.
- Proficiency in written and spoken English.
- Demonstrated ability to work independently and in interdisciplinary research groups.

Desirable Criteria

- Prior experience in laboratory-based isotope geochemistry.
- Proficiency in GIS and command-driven software programmes (e.g., Matlab).
- Willingness to work in typically cold, wet, and windy conditions and mountainous terrain.
Applications
- CV (two pages max.).
- Cover letter (two pages max.) – Here the applicant is required to describe their interest in the programme and how their skills/competencies match their selected PhD topic.
- Contact details for two referees.

Please email all documents as one pdf file to gordon.bromley@universityofgalway.ie
Application deadline
Further information
Contact Name: Dr Gordon Bromley
Contact Email: gordon.bromley@universityofgalway.ie
Contact email
gordon.bromley@universityofgalway.ie

Fully funded PhD, coupled climate and ice sheet modelling - St. John's, Canada

St. John's , Canada
Category
Logistics
Associated benefit: the spectacular natural environment of
Newfoundland, Canada

Start date: Sept 1/2023

Details of graduate studies in Physics and Physical Oceanography at
Memorial University can be found at
http://www.mun.ca/physics/graduate_students/
Description
This studentship has two related projects:

Project 1A: History matching (cf
https://www.physics.mun.ca/~lev/revCalG.pdf) of a global coupled ice
and climate model for the last glacial cycle. From Last Glacial
Maximum onward, glacial geology and relative sea level data provide a
strong set of constraints which are a challenge to fit. Conversely,
prior to LGM, there are few constraints on ice sheet evolution aside
from global (accurately far-field) sea level proxies. However there
are many more constraints on regional climate from ice core,
terrestrial, and marine core records. This history matching will
therefore focus on pre-LGM global ice sheet and climate evolution
relying more on paleoclimate constraints.

Project 1B: Using the history-matched parameter vectors from project
1A, examine the stability of select glacial/deglacial intervals of the
last 2 million years including comparison of the relative role of key
feedbacks in the ice and climate system and analysis of noise
sensitivity (eg from large volcanic events).

These projects will rely on a hierarchy of coupled ice and climate models
including the LCice2.0 coupled glacial system model and LOVECLIM EMIC
(an earlier version was detailed in Bahadory and Tarasov, GMD, 2018, Bahadory et al,
TCD 2020) as well as a version coupled to Plasim (Andres and Tarasov, CP 2019).
Tasks
Applications for any of the positions are invited from candidates with
an interest in modelling ice sheet and climate interactions and Earth
Systems science. Applicants must have their Masters degree in
physics, geophysics, applied mathematics, or closely related
fields. They must be fluent in English. Applicants must also be
interested in working in a collaborative environment in
computationally intensive projects
Requirements
-Experience in: coding in F90 (or F95), C, or Python; shell scripting; and
analysis
packages such as OCTAVE/MATLAB, R, CDO, ...

-Knowledge of general physics and some exposure to fluid dynamics or
continuum mechanics (even better with understanding of geophysical
fluid dynamics and/or atmospheric or ocean physics or glaciology)

-Fluency in relevant maths (linear/matrix algebra, partial
differential equations, and vector calculus)

-Working familiarity with Linux
Applications
Interested students should contact:

Lev Tarasov
Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography
Memorial University of Newfoundland
St. John's, NL A1B 3X7
lev@mun.ca
http://www.physics.mun.ca/~lev/

include the following:

1. A cover letter including your name, academic status and contact
details, as well as the names and contact details of two faculty advisers from
whom confidential letters may be sought.
2. A statement of interest including long-term academic plans, research
interests,...
3. A short resume/CV, including a list of courses taken, and grades.
4. A self evaluation of strong and weak research skills, skills you
particularly want to develop, and likes and dislikes associated with
research and modelling.

Lev Tarasov - Dept of Physics and Physical Oceanography,
Memorial University of Newfoundland.
email: lev@mun.ca
http://www.physics.mun.ca/~lev/
Tel (709)-864-2675
Fax (709)-864-8739
Contact email
lev@mun.ca

Fully funded PhD, coupled climate and ice sheet modelling - St. John's, Canada

St. John's , Canada
Category
Logistics
Associated benefit: the spectacular natural environment of
Newfoundland, Canada

Start date: Sept 1/2023

Details of graduate studies in Physics and Physical Oceanography at
Memorial University can be found at
http://www.mun.ca/physics/graduate_students/
Description
This studentship has two related projects:

Project 1A: History matching (cf
https://www.physics.mun.ca/~lev/revCalG.pdf) of a global coupled ice
and climate model for the last glacial cycle. From Last Glacial
Maximum onward, glacial geology and relative sea level data provide a
strong set of constraints which are a challenge to fit. Conversely,
prior to LGM, there are few constraints on ice sheet evolution aside
from global (accurately far-field) sea level proxies. However there
are many more constraints on regional climate from ice core,
terrestrial, and marine core records. This history matching will
therefore focus on pre-LGM global ice sheet and climate evolution
relying more on paleoclimate constraints.

Project 1B: Using the history-matched parameter vectors from project
1A, examine the stability of select glacial/deglacial intervals of the
last 2 million years including comparison of the relative role of key
feedbacks in the ice and climate system and analysis of noise
sensitivity (eg from large volcanic events).

These projects will rely on a hierarchy of coupled ice and climate models
including the LCice2.0 coupled glacial system model and LOVECLIM EMIC
(an earlier version was detailed in Bahadory and Tarasov, GMD, 2018, Bahadory et al,
TCD 2020) as well as a version coupled to Plasim (Andres and Tarasov, CP 2019).
Tasks
Applications for any of the positions are invited from candidates with
an interest in modelling ice sheet and climate interactions and Earth
Systems science. Applicants must have their Masters degree in
physics, geophysics, applied mathematics, or closely related
fields. They must be fluent in English. Applicants must also be
interested in working in a collaborative environment in
computationally intensive projects
Requirements
-Experience in: coding in F90 (or F95), C, or Python; shell scripting; and
analysis
packages such as OCTAVE/MATLAB, R, CDO, ...

-Knowledge of general physics and some exposure to fluid dynamics or
continuum mechanics (even better with understanding of geophysical
fluid dynamics and/or atmospheric or ocean physics or glaciology)

-Fluency in relevant maths (linear/matrix algebra, partial
differential equations, and vector calculus)

-Working familiarity with Linux
Applications
Interested students should contact:

Lev Tarasov
Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography
Memorial University of Newfoundland
St. John's, NL A1B 3X7
lev@mun.ca
http://www.physics.mun.ca/~lev/

include the following:

1. A cover letter including your name, academic status and contact
details, as well as the names and contact details of two faculty advisers from
whom confidential letters may be sought.
2. A statement of interest including long-term academic plans, research
interests,...
3. A short resume/CV, including a list of courses taken, and grades.
4. A self evaluation of strong and weak research skills, skills you
particularly want to develop, and likes and dislikes associated with
research and modelling.

Lev Tarasov - Dept of Physics and Physical Oceanography,
Memorial University of Newfoundland.
email: lev@mun.ca
http://www.physics.mun.ca/~lev/
Tel (709)-864-2675
Fax (709)-864-8739
Contact email
lev@mun.ca

PhD, Geosciences - Alaska, USA

Alaska, United States
Category
Logistics
PhD research position available

University of Alaska Fairbanks Department of Geosciences is looking for a PhD student to start in late Summer, 2023. The incoming student will join an NSF-funded project examining marine-terrestrial connections on the Bering Land Bridge/Bering Sea over the past ~30 thousand years.
Description
The goals of this interdisciplinary project are to reconstruct the vegetation of interior and coastal sites on the emergent Bering Land Bridge and evaluate the relationship between sea ice extent and aridity during the Pleistocene and Holocene.
Tasks
The student will kick-start their PhD research with a month-long cruise in the Bering Sea to collect sediment cores in August, 2023. Applicants must be accepted into the UAF graduate program and enroll for Fall semester prior to the start date of the summer research assistantship.


Requirements
Students interested in paleoclimatology, paleoecology, and/or sedimentology are encouraged to apply. The student will use diatoms and fossil pollen as markers for environmental change and thus it is imperative that the student is comfortable using a microscope for long hours. Prior taxonomic experience is not necessary but would be an advantage.
Applications
Prospective students are encouraged to contact Dr. Sarah Fowell (sjfowell@alaska.edu) or Dr. Beth Caissie (bcaissie@usgs.gov) for more information. Refer to the UAF graduate website for pre-requisites and details about how to apply for the graduate program: www.uaf.edu/geosciences/graduate_programs/graduate_programs.php
Contact email
sjfowell@alaska.edu

PhD, Palaeoclimatology - Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Theme
Category
Logistics
Duration: 3.5 years funded by NERC
Start date: October 2023
Workplace: Department of Geography and Environmental Sciences, Northumbria University
Principal supervisor: Vasile Ersek
Studentship awards include 3.5 years of fees, an annual living allowance (£17,668) and a Research Training Support Grant (for travel, consumables, as required).
Description
Project title: A detailed climatic context for the growth and decay of Cretan Civilisations

Project Description: The degree to which ancient civilisations have been affected by climate changes is hotly debated. Many ancient societies were resilient to climate changes and the causal link between societal collapse and climate change often remains obscure. Associations between climate change and collapse of civilisations have been proposed in many parts of the world, including the Yucatan Peninsula, the Middle East, the Indus Valley and the Eastern Mediterranean. However, such links have often been made based on palaeoclimate reconstructions with large chronological uncertainties or using low-resolution records. The island of Crete is the site of the oldest European civilisation, the Minoans. It also has a rich history of subsequent cultures, including Dorian, Mycenaean, classical Greek, Roman, Venetian and Ottoman. The island has a complex mountainous topography and a spatially heterogeneous climate. Recent palaeoclimate records from Crete document significant climate changes during the last 10,000 years and suggest that humans have played a dominant role in shaping the ecosystem of this region. But there is still a need for well-dated, high-resolution, spatially distributed palaeoclimatic records from Crete. With such records we will be able to constrain the seasonal to decadal-scale extreme climate events (droughts, wildfires) that are more likely to have impacted human societies. Speleothems grow in caves close to sites of human occupation and in Crete have a wide altitudinal and longitudinal distribution, allowing for a robust characterisation of Crete’s microclimates. They can be dated accurately and precisely with U-series dating, and several geochemical proxies (e.g. oxygen and carbon isotopes, trace elements, clumped isotopes) can be used to derive a wide range of paleoenvironmental information. This project will focus on producing high-resolution, well-dated climate records using speleothems from Crete and you will synthesise the existing climatic and archaeological data for the island. You will also take part in field expeditions to collect additional materials and you will set up a cave monitoring programme to understand how the climate signal is transmitted from the surface to the cave environments. You will be trained in state-of-the-art geochemical techniques and you will work with earth scientists and archaeologists from University of Birmingham, University of York, University of Patras, and the Heraklion Ephorate of Antiquities. You will receive training in getting papers published, writing grant applications, and conference presentations. There will also be opportunities for undergraduate teaching and research supervision.
Tasks
Geochemical analyses of speleothems
Requirements
MSc or BSc in Earth Sciences or related disciplines
Applications
To apply please go to www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/doctor-of-philosophy-drfxxr7/ and select October 2023. In the application, please mention project code OP2321.

You will be part of the OnePlanet Doctoral Training Partnership. For more information please see: research.ncl.ac.uk/one-planet/
Further information
Vasile Ersek, vasile.ersek@northumbria.ac.uk
Contact email
vasile.ersek@northumbria.ac.uk

2 x PhD positions, natural geologic emissions of methane & past variability in the galactic cosmic ray flux - NY, USA

Rochester, New York, United States
Category
Logistics
The Ice Core and Atmospheric Chemistry Lab and the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Group at the University of Rochester have openings for up to 2 PhD students.
Description
Students would work on research projects aiming to improve our understanding of the atmospheric cycle of methane in past, modern and future atmospheres. Methane is an important contributor to anthropogenic warming and a key player in global atmospheric chemistry, and its atmospheric concentration is currently rising at unprecedented rates.

The projects would provide experience with hands-on work in the field and laboratory, as well as with using chemistry-climate models to interpret observations.
Tasks
Phd 1) One of the available projects focuses on improved quantification of natural geologic emissions of methane. Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and its emissions are imperfectly understood, with natural geologic emissions (natural gas seeps, mud volcanoes and microseepage) being highly uncertain.

Further, large uncertainties in natural geologic emissions make it more difficult to accurately estimate our methane emissions from fossil fuel extraction and use.
This project would involve fieldwork in several hydrocarbon basins in the western US and extensive analysis of new and prior data to provide more accurate estimates of geologic methane emissions.
This project is collaborative between the research groups of Profs. Vas Petrenko and Thomas Weber.

PhD 2) We are also seeking applicants for a project that would involve a collaboration between the Earth and Environmental Sciences and Physics and Astronomy departments at the University of Rochester.

This project will seek to improve our understanding of past variability in the galactic cosmic ray flux. Cosmic rays originating from outside of our solar system constantly bombard the Earth, producing nuclides such as Carbon-14 and Beryllium-10 in the atmosphere and in surface materials.
Measurements of these nuclides in ice cores and near-surface rocks have been used to study important climate processes and parameters such as solar variability and ice sheet dynamics.
In order to fully interpret cosmogenic nuclide measurements, the history of the galactic cosmic ray flux must be known. This project will seek to improve our understanding of this history via measurements of Carbon-14 in Antarctic ice cores.
Requirements
Phd 1) The following experience and qualifications are desirable: strong mathematical preparation, coding experience, all-weather outdoor experience (e.g., hiking, backpacking), GIS, field geology, work with analytical instrumentation, strong communication skills. For further information, please contact Vas Petrenko at vasilii.petrenko@rochester.edu.

PhD 2) The following experience and qualifications are desirable: strong preparation in physics and mathematics, coding experience, cold-weather outdoor experience (e.g., hiking, skiing), strong communication skills.
Applications
PhD 1) For information on applying to the graduate program at the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester please see www.sas.rochester.edu/ees/graduate/apply.html.

PhD 2) Interested students may apply to either the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (contact Vas Petrenko at vasilii.petrenko@rochester.edu with questions) or the department of Physics and Astronomy (contact Segev BenZvi at sbenzvi@ur.rochester.edu) depending on their preference.
Application deadline
Further information
For further information, please contact Vas Petrenko at vasilii.petrenko@rochester.edu or Lee Murray at lee.murray@rochester.edu. For information on applying to the graduate program at the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester please see www.sas.rochester.edu/ees/graduate/apply.html.
Contact email
vasilii.petrenko@rochester.edu

PhD, Understanding wet woodland in the Anthropocene - Plymouth, UK

Plymouth, United Kingdom
Category
Logistics
The individual will be based at the University of Plymouth, with collaborations and supervision from the University of Exeter and Royal Holloway, University of London

Description
Globally, peatlands are essential terrestrial carbon stores that can provide nature-based solutions for climate change mitigation. One of the least well-understood types of peatlands in the world are wet woodlands (peatlands with substantial tree cover). Wet woodlands were once a common habitat type across the UK, but after years of disturbance and destruction, only an estimated 50–70,000 ha remain. Despite their scarcity, these ecosystems could be substantial, long-term carbon sinks due to their peat-forming characteristics. However, climate change and increasing development will determine whether these ecosystems become a source of carbon in the future.
Tasks
Seeking an individual who will i) quantify contemporary carbon dynamics and fluxes, ii) determine past landscape dynamics using paleoenvironmental techniques, iii) link current and future carbon sequestration to ecohydrological variables (i.e., water table depth), and iv) make comparisons to other wetland ecosystems (e.g., tropical peatlands).
Requirements
Looking for an enthusiastic individual with a degree in a relevant subject (e.g., environmental science, geography, biology); individuals from numerical disciplines are also encouraged to apply. Experience of fieldwork, programming and environmental sensors is desirable.
Applications
Apply here (deadline: 11 January 2023): www.plymouth.ac.uk/student-life/your-studies/research-degrees/doctoral-training-partnerships/aries-dtp
Application deadline
Further information
For more information: www.findaphd.com/phds/project/the-wetter-the-better-understanding-wet-woodland-carbon-dynamics-in-the-anthropocene/?p149241
Contact email
scott.davidson@plymouth.ac.uk

PhD, Geochemistry, Volcanism and Paleoclimate - Oldenburg, Germany

Oldenburg, Germany
Category
Logistics
The Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM) at the University of Oldenburg invites applications for the position of

1 doctoral candidate (m/w/d) in geochemistry, volcanism and paleoclimate
(salary according to E13 TV-L, 75%, incl. comprehensive social security plans)

The position is limited to 36 months. Earliest starting date: 01.12.2022
Description
The ICBM is an interdisciplinary research institute for fundamental and applied marine research. The internationally renowned institute aims at understanding the function of marine environmental systems through close cooperation of the various scientific disciplines (chemistry, biology, physics, mathematical modelling) of its more than 20 research groups. The working group Marine Isotope Geochemistry uses stable and radiogenic isotope systems (Si, Fe, Nd, Sr, Pb) and elemental analyses to investigate biogeochemical processes, element cycles and inputs to the ocean, and to reconstruct changes in the marine environment during past intervals of climate change.

The PhD project "Investigating the role of volcanism in the onset and termination of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)" is funded by the DFG and part of a larger collaborative effort in investigating the impact of the emplacement of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) on paleoclimate, and especially the hyperthermal PETM using IODP Expedition 396 material.
Tasks
The work will focus on a number of themes relating to the holistic role large-scale volcanic eruptions play in controlling climate change. To investigate the role of the NAIP in the onset of the PETM, the successful applicant will carry out geochemical characterization of ash layers preserved in sediments recovered during Expedition 396, and detailed logging of cores to estimate style and amount of explosive volcanism. In collaboration with Joost Frieling (University of Oxford) and Morgan Jones (University of Oslo), the applicant will incorporate these results with high resolution Hg/TOC measurements to assess total scale of volcanism. These data will be used to develop model based scenarios of carbon degassing, to determine if volcanic degassing could have driven the PETM onset. The applicant will also investigate evidence for volcanic ash deposition enhancing carbon burial and causing the end of the PETM. Elemental and isotopic (Sr isotopes) analysis of sediments and ash layers will clarify whether ash deposition led to enhanced carbon drawdown during the end of the PETM. This work will focus on the relative importance of ash as a supplier of nutrients to the ocean, and determine if this may have impacted cooling at the end of the PETM.

The successful candidate will be based in Oldenburg and closely collaborate with Dr. Jack Longman at the University of Northumbria in Newcastle. This will include several visits to Newcastle. Responsibilities for the candidate will be processing and analysis of elemental concentrations, Sr isotopes and the incorporation of results into large scale biogeochemical models. The candidate will interpret and publish the results in collaboration with other project partners.
Requirements
Recruitment requirements include a qualifying university degree (Master or diploma (not of a University of Applied Sciences)) in earth sciences, analytical chemistry or a related field. A strong background in inorganic-geochemical sample processing and analysis, preferably in the mass spectrometric analysis of trace elements and metal isotopes, are required. Knowledge and experience of core logging, and of volcanic ash analysis are advantageous. Experience with Matlab and biogeochemical modelling is also advantageous, but can be learned during the project. In addition, very good English language skills (written and spoken), and the willingness to carry out research stays in the United Kingdom are required.

International candidates and individuals who identify as underrepresented in science are especially encouraged to apply.

The University of Oldenburg is dedicated to increasing the percentage of female employees in the field of science. Therefore, female candidates are strongly encouraged to apply. In accordance with Lower Saxony regulations (§ 21 Section 3 NHG) female candidates with equal qualifications will be preferentially considered.
Applicants with disabilities will be given preference in case of equal qualification.
Applications
Please send your application including a cover letter, curriculum vitae, certificates and contact information of up to three references in a single document preferably by email with the subject "IODP 396 PETM" to mig-stellen@uol.de by November 4th, 2022.
Application deadline
Further information
For further information regarding this position, please contact Dr. Jack Longman (jack.longman@uol.de) or Prof. Katharina Pahnke (k.pahnke@icbm.de).
Read the job advert: https://uol.de/stellen?stelle=69125
Contact email
k.pahnke@icbm.de

PhD, Isotope Geochemistry and Paleoclimate - Oldenburg, Germany

Oldenburg, Germany
Category
Logistics
The Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM) at the University of Oldenburg invites applications for the position of a

doctoral candidate (m/w/d) in isotope geochemistry and paleoclimate
(salary according to E13 TV-L, 75%, incl. comprehensive social security plans)

The position is limited to 36 months. Earliest starting date: 01.12.2022

The ICBM is an interdisciplinary research institute for fundamental and applied marine research. The internationally renowned institute aims at understanding the function of marine environmental systems through close cooperation of the various scientific disciplines (chemistry, biology, physics, mathematical modelling) of its more than 20 research groups.
Description
The working group Marine Isotope Geochemistry uses stable and radiogenic isotope systems (Si, Fe, Nd, Sr, Pb) to investigate biogeochemical processes, element cycles and inputs to the ocean, and to reconstruct changes in the marine environment during past intervals of climate change.

The PhD project “The role of South Pacific dust provenance changes in Pliocene-Pleistocene climate variability (IODP Expedition 383)” is funded by the DFG and part of a larger collaborative effort in investigating climate variability in the Pacific Southern Ocean over the last 8 million years using IODP Expedition 383 (DYNAPACC) sample material.
Tasks
The work will use the dust fraction from two marine sediment cores collected during IODP Expedition 383. The PhD student will process the samples under trace metal free conditions for analysis of rare earth elements as well as lead (Pb), neodymium (Nd), and strontium (Sr) isotopes on the dust fraction. The individual dust source contributions to the sites will be quantified using the geochemical data and a Bayesian mixing model. The quantitative dust provenance data will provide important information on the environmental conditions in the dust source regions and the dust transport dynamics in the South Pacific during key climate intervals of the last 8 million years.

Responsibilities of the successful candidate include the processing and analysis of samples for rare earth element concentrations and Nd, Pb and Sr isotopes, as well as for U-Th and/or He isotopes during a research stay abroad. The candidate is furthermore responsible for the documentation, interpretation and publication of the data and results in collaboration with other project partners.
Requirements
Recruitment requirements include a qualifying university degree (Master or diploma (not of a University of Applied Sciences)) in earth sciences, analytical chemistry or a related field. Strong skills in inorganic-geochemical sample processing and analysis, preferably in the mass spectrometric analysis of trace elements and metal isotopes are required. A background in paleoclimate/paleoceanography and experience with R and GIS software are an advantage. In addition, the position requires very good English language skills (written and spoken), the willingness to carry out a two-month research stay abroad, and a strong interest in collaborative research.

International candidates and individuals who identify as underrepresented in science are especially encouraged to apply.

The University of Oldenburg is dedicated to increasing the percentage of female employees in the field of science. Therefore, female candidates are strongly encouraged to apply. In accordance with Lower Saxony regulations (§ 21 Section 3 NHG) female candidates with equal qualifications will be preferentially considered.
Applicants with disabilities will be given preference in case of equal qualification.
Applications
Please send your application including a cover letter, curriculum vitae, certificates and contact information of up to three references in a single document preferably by email with the subject "IODP 383 dust provenance" to mig-stellen@uol.de by November 4th, 2022.
Application deadline
Further information
For further information regarding this position, please contact Dr. Torben Struve (t.struve@icbm.de).
See the job advert: https://uol.de/stellen?stelle=69124
Contact email
t.struve@icbm.de

MSc & PhD Opportunity, Peatlands - Ontario, Canada

Ontario, Canada
Theme
Category
Logistics
The University of Waterloo invites applications for one MSc and one PhD position to participate in a recently funded collaborative research project called “Can-Peat: Canada’s peatlands as nature-based solutions to climate change”. The main goal of the Can-Peat project is to quantify the potential of peatland management in Canada to contribute to climate change mitigation as a nature-based solution.
Description
The Can-Peat project objectives are to create a Canadian peatland research network to advance models of peatland carbon cycling from site to national-scale and develop a decision-support framework for peatland management. The students will be guided by a team of researchers from the University of Waterloo and collaborators from partners in governments, industries, and conservation organizations.
Tasks
The MSc student will assemble a dataset of peatland physical, hydrological, and biogeochemical properties (including experimental data and field observations) from the selected study sites in the compilation of peatland datasets proposed in Can-Peat project. MSc student will use a robust machine learning model using the data to identify key environmental drivers and predict future changes in greenhouse gas emission rates under future climate scenarios. The goal will be to establish how peatlands in different regions are expected to respond to changing anthropogenic disturbances and climate warming to better understand the peatland carbon and greenhouse gas exchange and the resilience of their carbon source/sink function to disturbance.

The PhD student will develop the reactive transport sub-models that evaluate the biogeochemical transformations of carbon and nutrients in peatlands under examples of anthropogenic disturbances and climatic scenarios to estimate the changes in carbon stocks and budgets for the future peatland ecosystems carbon balances. The outputs of these sub-models will be incorporated into the Canadian Model for Peatlands, to improve regional to national estimates of Net ecosystem exchange and carbon emissions into the Canadian Model for Peatlands frameworks for application at multiple scales and for spatially-referenced and spatially-explicit modelling approaches.
Requirements
Applicants must have (or expect to soon complete) a degree in biogeochemistry, hydrology, soil science or a related field. Preference will be given to candidates with strong quantitative skills and demonstrated experience in one or more of the following areas: terrestrial biogeochemistry, environmental engineering, reactive transport modeling, and environmental climate change impact analysis.

MSc student position can be created in lieu of a PhD position for exceptional candidates who prefer to undertake a Master’s degree.
Applications
If you have any questions regarding the application process and, eligibility, or a request for accommodation during the selection process, please contact Dr. Fereidoun Rezanezhad
(frezanez@uwaterloo.ca) and Dr. Philippe Van Cappellen (pvc@uwaterloo.ca).

Please submit your application package electronically as a single pdf file to Dr. Fereidoun Rezanezhad (frezanez@uwaterloo.ca). In your application email, please include “Can-Peat-MSc or PhD#_yourname” in the subject line and attach a single PDF file that contains:

- Your motivation for applying to the position and your research interests
- Curriculum vitae
- Copy of transcript(s) (unofficial transcripts will be accepted at the application stage)
- Contact information for up to 3 references

Closing date: Applications will be reviewed as they are received. The positions will remain open until filled. We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those individuals selected for an interview will be contacted.
Application deadline
Further information
If you have any questions regarding the application process and, eligibility, or a request for accommodation during the selection process, please contact Dr. Fereidoun Rezanezhad
(frezanez@uwaterloo.ca) and Dr. Philippe Van Cappellen (pvc@uwaterloo.ca).
Contact email
frezanez@uwaterloo.ca