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Postdoc

Postdoc, Palaeoenvironmental Research - Cambridge, UK

Cambridge, United Kingdom
Category
Logistics
PDRA Quaternary Sedimentologist/Geochemist – The Big Thaw Highlight Topic Grant

Contract Type: Full Time
Duration: Fixed Term Appointment - 30 months
Salary: £31,931 to £39,915 per annum
Benefits: We offer generous benefits
Team: Palaeo-environments, Ice sheets and Climate Change (PICC)
Location: BAS Cambridge, fieldwork and laboratory locations in the UK and overseas as required
Closing Date: Tuesday, 21 February 2023

Applications are invited for a 2½ year (30-month) postdoctoral research position in Palaeoenvironmental Research at the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). The successful applicant will join the ‘Big Thaw’ project (PI: Dr. Hamish Pritchard), an ambitious new UKRI/NERC-funded Highlight Topic project assessing past, present and future changes in global mountain water resources from snow and ice. Working within the sedimentology Work Package of The Big Thaw project, and with guidance from Dr. Steve Roberts, and Dr. Bianca Perren within the Palaeoenvironments, Ice Sheets and Climate Change (PICC) team at BAS Cambridge, the new PDRA will undertake physical, geochemical and chronological analysis of new lake sediment records from the Himalayas to reconstruct past environmental change and help answer the following questions: How frequently do extreme wet and dry years occur in the mountain cryosphere over centennial (to millennial) timescales, what climate factors caused this, and how will they change in the future?
Description
The mountain cryosphere is so large, varied, inhospitable, and changeable that we must rely on models of snowfall and runoff to map and manage these water resources and to predict how they will evolve. This is an important goal because meltwater released each summer is an extraordinary generator of wealth and wellbeing in rich and poor countries, sustaining a sixth of the global population and a quarter of GDP, but it is also among the most sensitive of all major ecosystem-services to climate change. The loss of snow and ice poses a global threat to secure water, food, energy, and livelihood for hundreds of millions of people, but how much water the mountain cryosphere provides, and how its role will change, remains remarkably uncertain because model skill is fundamentally limited by the quality and availability of the key observations and field data needed to test and develop them. Essentially, existing observations are too sparse, small-scale, poorly distributed, inaccurate, infrequent, or short-lived to constrain models adequately.

The Big Thaw project aims to transform our understanding of current and past changes in snow accumulation in the Himalayas and the impact that climate change is having on mountain water resources. A key component of the project is reconstructing long-term extreme flood and drought events in the Himalayas using lake sediments. Evidence from lake records and other field observations will be used to calibrate and refine relevant model processes. This will help to eliminate gross biases and reduce uncertainties in model outputs across all model scales, past, present, and future, and aid the development local resilience and adaptation strategies to protect societal infrastructure.
Tasks
The main tasks and an outline timetable for this 2 ½ year post-doc will be:

• Prepare for fieldwork, set up laboratory work and protocols (Apr/May-Sept 2023)
• Collect new sediment cores from 3 lakes at 4000-5000 m altitude in NW Nepal, along the shared drainage divide of the Brahmaputra, Indus and Ganges basins (Sept-Nov 2023)
• Apply a range of state-of-the-art analytical sedimentological and geochemical techniques to these sediment cores in BAS, UK and overseas laboratories (2024/5) – see post description for details
• Produce highly resolved, multi-proxy reconstructions from sediment core parameters and catchment reference material (2024/5)
• Reconstruct a multi-century, and potentially annually resolved, record of precipitation extremes in conjunction with other Work Packages in The Big Thaw project (2024/5)
Requirements
The successful candidate will have a PhD in Geosciences or a related discipline, and experience of palaeoenvironmental reconstruction; be experienced in a range of sedimentological, geochemical and chronological analytical and data processing techniques; experience of lake sediment coring and/or fieldwork experience in remote environments is desirable (ideally with Himalayan fieldwork/trekking experience).
Applications
Apply online: https://bas.ciphr-irecruit.com/applicants/vacancy/375/PDRA-Quaternary-SedimentologistGeochemist--The-Big-Thaw--Highlight-Topic-Grant
Application deadline
Further information
For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Dr Steve Roberts (sjro@bas.ac.uk). For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Dr Steve Roberts (sjro@bas.ac.uk) and Bianca Perren (biaper@bas.ac.uk).

View job description: file:///Users/chene/Downloads/Job%20Profile%20document.pdf
Contact email
sjro@bas.ac.uk

Postdoc researcher - Bremen, Germany

Bremen, Germany
Category
Logistics
Postdoctoral researcher for 2 years at Marum-Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Germany. Salary group 13 TV-L / full-time position. Supervisor: PD Dr Mahyar Mohtadi
Description
Presently, coastal regions offshore west Sumatra are critical for the development of largescale climate anomalies across the Indian Ocean. Changes in local sea surface and thermocline temperatures area capable of affecting atmospheric convection and rainfall not only in the Indian Ocean realm but also across the globe. However, the role of sea-level in shaping the climate of this region is disputed, both in simulations and in reconstructions. Available records from the eastern Indian Ocean are not suitable to convincingly reconstruct the spatiotemporal patterns of ocean-atmosphere conditions and their relationship to sea-level changes. This endeavor aims to detect whether and how changes in sea-level triggered basin-wide anomalies in circulation and rainfall.
Tasks
Reconstructing the evolution of mean annual sea surface and thermocline temperatures together with rainfall isotopes offshore west Sumatra since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). To this end, deuterium isotopes in plant waxes will be measured along with shell Mg/Ca of a surface- and a thermocline-dwelling planktic foraminifera species. In addition, Individual Foraminifera Analysis will be used to assess the range, or stability, of sea surface and thermocline temperatures during five different sea-level stands since the LGM.
Requirements
A PhD in geosciences, chemistry, marine sciences, climate sciences or related fields
Experience with inorganic and/or organic geochemistry laboratory
Strong analytical chemistry skills
Strong English language skills
Applications
Applications with the usual information, i.e. cover letter stating interest and motivation, CV, copies of degree certificates, and two letters of reference, should be submitted by mentioning the reference number A9/23 until March 21st, 2023 as one single PDF to mmohtadi@marum.de
Application deadline
Contact email
mmohtadi@marum.de

Postdoc, Palaeoecology - Bern, Switzerland

Bern, Switzerland
Category
Logistics
Postdoctoral research associate position in Palaeoecology at University of Bern

The successful candidate will work in the research section of Prof. Willy Tinner and help to coordinate the ERC (European Research Council) and SNF (Swiss National Science Foundation) projects.

The position is available from 01.04.2023, for a period of 12 months, extendable for up to one year by arrangement. The gross annual salary falls within the range CHF 80,000 to 105,000 per year. Part-time employment can be negotiated.

We offer an inspiring and innovative research environment with access to state-of-the-art infrastructure within a diverse and motivated team. The palaeoecology research section comprises two research groups, vegetation dynamics and population dynamics. The palaeoecology laboratory is located at the Institute of Plant Sciences in the Botanical Garden of University of Bern (Altenbergrain 21 in Bern). Further information on the research of the palaeoecology section of University of Bern is available at https://www.ips.unibe.ch/research/paleo/index_eng.html, publications are listed at https://www.ips.unibe.ch/research/paleo/publications/index_eng.html.
Description
For the ERC project see https://www.ips.unibe.ch/research/paleo/projects/explo/index_eng.html
For the SNF project see: https://www.ips.unibe.ch/research/paleo/projects/ecological_varve_series/index_eng.html)
These projects are part of the Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research of University of Bern (https://www.oeschger.unibe.ch/index_eng.html) and deal with Mediterranean vegetation dynamics in Greece and Italy during the past 10,000 years.
Tasks
Postdoctoral position in the development and use of palaeoecological data to study vegetational dynamics in response to climate change, disturbance and land use.
Requirements
The ideal candidate should have a PhD in Biology, Environmental Sciences or Earth Sciences with a strong background in numerical analysis and optical microscopy, specifically palynology and plant macrofossil analysis. A record of high-quality research (MSc and PhD level) and successful international publication experience are essential. Knowledge of Mediterranean vegetation is required. The ability to work well in a team will be crucial as projects will be highly collaborative, involving external university and public partners.
Applications
The deadline for applications is 19 February 2023, please submit your application including motivation letter, CV, summary of research achievements and contact details of two references as one .pdf file to
Prof. Willy Tinner (willy.tinner@ips.unibe.ch).
Application deadline
Contact email
willy.tinner@ips.unibe.ch

Postdoc Positions, Arctic Paleoclimatology - AZ and NY, USA

AZ and NY, United States
Category
Logistics
Postdoc Positions in Arctic Paleoclimatology, University at Buffalo (Buffalo, NY, USA) and Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff, AZ, USA)

Seeking applications for two Post-Doctoral Research Associates to join an NSF-funded project to explore patterns and processes of rapid Arctic warming events by combining paleoclimate proxies and models. The UB postdoc will generate and interpret, using traditional frameworks and proxy system models, high-resolution lipid biomarker and compound-specific stable isotope records from lakes around the Arctic Ocean seaboard. The NAU postdoc will use an emerging Arctic paleoclimate database and climate model simulations to examine the spatial and temporal dynamics of abrupt warming events in the Arctic.
Description
There are opportunities to participate in semester-long exchanges between institutions, and in outreach activities in Buffalo and Flagstaff. We encourage candidates from groups underrepresented in the geosciences (including, but not limited to, black, indigenous, and people of color) to apply; we are committed to creating an inclusive environment for all team members.

The positions include stipends and benefits, and are supported for one year, with the possibility of extending to a second year. Details in job application links below. Applicants may also visit https://ubwp.buffalo.edu/rapidarcticwarming/ or contact Dr. Elizabeth Thomas (ekthomas@buffalo.edu) or Dr. Nick McKay (Nicholas.McKay@nau.edu) for more information.
Tasks
Along with the rest of the project team, the postdocs will improve understanding of the mechanisms behind Arctic climate responses to rapid warming. We are seeking highly motivated scientists who strive for original scientific achievements obtained in team work.
Requirements
Minimum Qualifications for UB:
PhD in (Paleo)climate science, atmospheric sciences, geochemistry, meteorology, or other related fields
Leadership in scientific peer-reviewed publications
Experience generating and interpreting lipid biomarker and/or stable isotope paleoclimate proxy records

Bonus Experience for UB:
Experience with climate or proxy system models
Experience with scientific computing (e.g., R, Matlab, Python, etc.)

Minimum Qualifications for NAU:
PhD in (Paleo)climate science, atmospheric sciences, meteorology, applied mathematics/statistics or other related fields
Leadership in scientific peer-reviewed publications
Scientific computing (e.g., R, Matlab, Python, etc.).

Bonus Experience for NAU:
Familiarity with paleoclimate proxies and uncertainties
Experience with climate or proxy system models
Applications
TO APPLY to the UB position, visit https://www.ubjobs.buffalo.edu/postings/39158
TO APPLY to the NAU position, visit: https://hr.peoplesoft.nau.edu/psp/ph92prta/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_APP_SCHJOB.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=606841&PostingSeq=1

Applications include a CV, a cover letter, and the contact information for three references. We will start reviewing applications on January 6, 2023 and continue until the position is filled.
Contact email
ekthomas@buffalo.edu

Post-Doctoral Researcher: Proxies for Past Storminess

Maynooth, Ireland
Category
Logistics
Start date: 20th March 2023 or as soon as possible thereafter
Duration: 18 months
The position will be based at Maynooth University within the climate research centre ICARUS (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/icarus) and the Geography Department.
Salary: €41,209 per annum with annual increments
Description
We are seeking a Post-Doctoral Researcher to work on an Irish Research Council funded project (HoStIr: Holocene Storminess in Ireland). The HoStIr project seeks to comprehensively test whether two proxies for past sea spray deposition to coastal peatlands (bromine and testate amoebae biomass) can be used to reconstruct past storminess in Ireland (Strand 1; S1). The project will then go on to develop multi-millennial records of past storminess for western Ireland (S2) and use these to conduct a data-model comparison of past storminess (S3). The successful candidate will join HoStIr and play a critical role in leading Strand 1 of the project, as well as contributing to subsequent work strands. The project will also be undertaken by the PI (Dr Lisa Orme, leading Strand 2) and a second postdoctoral researcher focusing on data-model comparisons (Strand 3).
Tasks
Main tasks:
- Coring of coastal peatlands during three fieldtrips within Ireland
- Testing whether bromine or testate amoebae biomass (e.g. Whittle et al., 2019, Microbial Ecology) can be used as storminess proxies.
- Contributing to the development of storminess records spanning the Holocene
Requirements
The ideal candidate will have:
Essential
• A PhD in palaeoclimate / palaeoecological research or a cognate discipline.
Desirable
• Experience of peatland-based fieldwork, laboratory-based work and/or microscope analysis
• Experience in delivering research projects to a high standard.
• A history of publication commensurate with career stage.
• Excellent oral, written, and analytical skills.
Applications
Deadline: 8th January 2023, 23:30 hrs (local Irish time)
Apply here:
https://my.corehr.com/pls/nuimrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.display_form?p_company=1&p_internal_external=E&p_display_in_irish=N&p_process_type=&p_applicant_no=&p_form_profile_detail=&p_display_apply_ind=Y&p_refresh_search=Y&p_recruitment_id=019141
Further information
For further information please contact Dr Lisa Orme at lisa.orme@mu.ie
Contact email
lisa.orme@mu.ie

Postdoc, climate dynamics and modelling - Bordeaux, France

Bordeaux, France
Category
Logistics
36-month postdoctoral position on the “development of a Holocene emergent constraint
framework to assist decadal climate prediction systems”.
Description
A Postdoctoral fellowship is available at the University of Bordeaux to work within the UKRIfunded project “Rethinking Palaeoclimatology for Society” led by Celia Martin-Puertas (Royal Holloway University of London). The project put together proxy-based palaeoclimatologists and climate modelers to better understand Holocene decadal climate variability. The proxy-based group will apply advanced statistical approaches to generated annual, quantitative proxy data from European seasonally-laminated lake sediments, which will be coupled with modelling work.
Tasks
The postdoc fellowhip aims to (i) compare climate model simulations and reconstructions over Europe for decadal to multi-centennial climate variability (ii) apply emergent constraint framework to decadal climate predictions to evaluate the potential for improvements skill.

The research is based on a co-production approach, in which the scientists work closely with climate policy organisations and officers to co-design advanced research outputs to address urgent policy relevant climate issues and to deliver the information in the right format to be used by stakeholders / policy makers. The candidate will have the opportunity to undertake a 3-month policy secondment at the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) to learn about the policy process and get the foundations to conduct palaeoclimate research for impact. In addition, there will be fieldwork opportunities during the project.

While climate change is getting very clear in the recent decades, its projections remain highly uncertain. This is notably due to the large differences that can be found among the behavior of climate models developed worldwide to increase in greenhouse gases. Some statistical methods have been developed recently to try to reduce this uncertainty from climate models using observed climate. Furthermore, to include natural variability in our prediction of future climate, the initial conditions of the ocean are now used in the framework of decadal predictions. Those model simulations improve the near-term estimate of future climate. Nevertheless, up to now emergent constraint has not been applied to this type of predictions, notably due to the poor evaluation of natural climate variability.

The present project proposes to close this gap by assessing the potential of climatic reconstructions over the Holocene to constrain decadal predictions. For this purpose, you will compare decadal to centennial variability of climate models over Europe from CMIP6 database with existing and new high-resolution climate reconstructions over Europe that will be produced within the project. From this knowledge, you will then apply emergent constraint framework to existing decadal predictions to evaluate the potential of using knowledge of reconstructed climate variability over Europe for our estimates of near-term climate variations.

You will be mainly located on the University campus where EPOC laboratory is located, working especially with the IPSL-EPOC decadal prediction team as well as the paleoclimate team. Some stays or regular meetings with other identified collaborative laboratories in the UK (RHUL, MetOffice, University of Southampton).
Requirements
We are searching for a multi-disciplinary profile, requiring a very open-minded approach. We expect a PhD in environmental sciences with an interest in climate dynamics and statistics and deep knowledge in climate data analysis. The position is offered for 36 months in total. Payment will be in accordance with French public service salaries (between 2500 and 3000 euros per month before taxes, depending on experience). The ideal starting date would be Spring 2022.

The applicant will be primarily supervised by Didier Swingedouw and they will be part of the wider team led by Dr Celia Martin Puertas, and will work closely with the other research fellows and investigators on the project. Career development of the researcher is a priority to us and we will provide opportunities for career development and mentoring
Applications
Applications will be accepted by email only, until the 1st of February 2023. They should comprise: a CV with scientific experience, a letter of motivation with an availability date, and some referee name(s).
Application deadline
Further information
Applications and queries should be sent to Didier Swingedouw (didier.swingedouw@ubordeaux.fr)
Contact email
didier.swingedouw@ubordeaux.fr

Postdoctoral Position, Past Millennium Tropical Cyclones - Norfolk, USA

Norfolk, United States
Category
Logistics
2-Year Postdoc Position in past millennium tropical cyclones at Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA, USA)

The Old Dominion University (ODU) Research Foundation in Norfolk, Virginia is seeking applications for a Post-Doctoral Research Associate to join an NSF-funded project to explore North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the last millennium by combining sediment paleoclimate proxies and models.
Description
The postdoc will develop methods to integrate TC models with existing paleohurricane proxies to improve understanding of how TCs respond to natural climate variability/external forcing factors on multi-decadal to centennial timescales.

The position is supported for up to two years, pending satisfactory progress during the first year, and covers an annual stipend of $50,000 with a benefits package. Applicants may contact Dr. Lizzie Wallace (ejwallac@odu.edu) for more information.
Tasks
The successful candidate will work directly with Dr. Lizzie Wallace at the Department of Ocean and Earth Sciences at ODU and collaborate with the whole project team including Drs. Sylvia Dee (Rice University), Gabriel Vecchi (Princeton University) and Kerry Emanuel (MIT).
Requirements
Minimum Qualifications:
PhD in (Paleo)climate science, meteorology, applied mathematics/statistics or other related fields
Numerical/statistical and geospatial modeling
Scientific computing (e.g., Matlab, Python, etc.).
Publishing peer-reviewed publications.
Bonus Experience:
Familiarity with paleoclimate proxies and uncertainties
Experience working with climate model and/or tropical cyclone model output (HiRAM, statistical/dynamically downscaled)
Applications
Visit hera.odurf.odu.edu/careers//Careers.aspx?req=22-054&type=JOBDESCR.

Applications include a CV, a cover letter, and the contact information for three references. We will review applications on a rolling basis as they come in and continue until the position is filled.
Contact email
ejwallac@odu.edu

Postdoc Research Associate, volcanic eruption clusters in abrupt pre-Holocene cold events - Cambridge, UK

Cambridge, United Kingdom
Category
Logistics
The Arnell Post-Doctoral Research Associate will work on a project funded by the Centre for Climate Repair at the University of Cambridge, based at the Department of Geography, and will work under the guidance of Dr Francesco Muschitiello.

The application deadline is 13 January 2023. The position is funded for 24 months in the first instance with a salary range of £34,308-£42,155.
Description
Stratospheric injection of aerosols by explosive volcanic eruptions results in a complex set of responses driving climate effects on a variety of time and spatial scales. However, the mechanisms by which volcanic forcing causes global and regional cooling on long timescales remain insufficiently examined. In particular, the climate feedbacks and responses to a close succession of strong volcanic eruptions are still poorly quantified, which hinders assessing future climate projections to volcanic activity (Zanchettin et al., 2016).
Tasks
This project aims at investigating the potential of clusters of strong volcanic eruptions to cause sustained cold events under pre-Holocene climate scenarios. The successful applicant will design and run transient climate model experiments using Earth system models that include atmospheric chemistry-aerosol-climate coupling, i.e. one or two of the following models: UKESM1, MPI-ESM1.2, and HadCM3. The simulations will be performed under a range of glacial boundary conditions to determine the cooling potential of volcanic clusters and assess short- and long-term memory of regional and global climatic variability. Particular attention will be paid to how volcanic cluster signals propagate into the subsurface ocean and the associated determinant processes, the ocean memory effects and the coupling between northward heat transport, Arctic sea ice and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Finally, the experiments will be evaluated using a wide network of proxy-climate data by comparing reconstructed and simulated spatial temperature and precipitation patterns.

The applicant will work with Dr Francesco Muschitiello and be supported by a team of international scientists including Dr Peter Hopcroft (University of Birmingham), Dr Claudia Timmreck (Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology), Dr Davide Zanchettin (University of Venice) and Dr Thomas Aubry (University of Exeter).
Requirements
Eligible candidates must have a PhD (or equivalent degree) in Climate Physics, Applied Mathematics, Earth Sciences or allied disciplines. A background in palaeoclimate modelling is desirable. They must be highly motivated, have excellent time management, organisational and communication skills, and be able to work well as part of a team. The successful candidate will be based in Cambridge and work closely with Dr Francesco Muschitiello and an international network of collaborators, i.e. Dr Thomas Aubry (University of Exeter), Dr Peter Hopcroft (University of Birmingham), Dr Claudia Timmreck (Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology), Dr Davide Zanchettin (University of Venice). They will have the opportunity to participate in a wide range of activities within the Centre for Climate Repair and the Department of Geography, including the departmental 'Climate and Environmental Dynamics' research group, and reading groups and seminars across the University.

They will be invited to become a member of Downing College and of its Middle Common Room (MCR) with associated privileges, and it is expected that the candidate will make an active contribution towards College life, educationally and socially.
Applications
Apply online: www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/37978/
Please quote reference LC34026 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.
Application deadline
Further information
For more information and to apply, please see www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/37978/.
Contact email
fm476@cam.ac.uk

Postdoctoral Position, peatland science - Calgary, Canada

Calgary, Canada
Theme
Category
Logistics
Postdoc opportunity at the University of Calgary

Dr. David OIefeldt is inviting candidates with a PhD and interests in peatland science to develop a funding application for a postdoctoral position through the Polar Knowledge Canada Fellowship Program. Additional funding is available to top up salary and support field research.
Description
The ongoing research in northern Canada is focused on understanding impacts of permafrost thaw and wildfire on the greenhouse gas balance and water quality in peatlands (www.caws.ualberta.ca).
Tasks
Research can focus on a combination of peat core analysis, controls on peat quality and biodegradability, or monitoring of greenhouse gas fluxes using soil chambers or eddy covariance techniques - or research proposed by the candidate. Field research would be possible in 2023 or 2024, depending on start date.
Requirements
For information, contact David Olefeldt, olefeldt@ualberta.ca.
Applications
Deadline for Polar application is January 16, 2023.
Application deadline
Contact email
olefeldt@ualberta.ca

Postdoc Research Associate, paleoclimate modeling - Cambridge, UK

Cambridge, United Kingdom
Category
Logistics
Applications are invited for the Arnell Post-Doctoral Research Associate position for a fixed-term of 24 months to work on a project funded by the Centre for Climate Repair at the University of Cambridge. The post holder will be based at the Department of Geography and will work under the guidance of Dr Francesco Muschitiello.

The Arnell Post-Doctoral Research Associate will be invited to become a member of Downing College and of its Middle Common Room (MCR) with associated privileges, and it is expected that the candidate will make an active contribution towards College life, educationally and socially.

Closing Date for Receipt of Applications: 13th January 2023
Interview date: 30th January 2023
Anticipated Start Date: 1st May 2023 (or as soon as possible)
Description
Quantifying the long-term effects of volcanic clusters using palaeoclimate modeling.

Stratospheric injection of aerosols by explosive volcanic eruptions results in a complex set of responses driving climate effects on a variety of time and spatial scales. However, the mechanisms by which volcanic forcing causes global and regional cooling on long timescales remain insufficiently examined. In particular, the climate feedbacks and responses to a close succession of strong volcanic eruptions are still poorly quantified, which hinders assessing future climate projections to volcanic activity (Zanchettin et al., 2016).

Past analogues offer an ideal laboratory to improve our understanding of the mechanisms that triggered long-term natural cooling periods and may help assess the potential for such events in the future. Climate model simulations show that hemispheric-wide multidecadal- to millennial-scale cold events of the Holocene cannot be fully explained by a combination of external forcing and internal feedbacks, and require the additional influence of volcanic activity on the coupled ocean–atmosphere system (Bader et al., 2020; Kobashi et al., 2017; Neukom et al., 2019). However, beyond the Holocene the impact of volcanic forcing on climate change is still heavily under-explored. New-generation ice-core records of volcanism (Lin et al., 2021; Sigl et al., 2022) suggest that series of large explosive eruptions preceded some of the abrupt climate shifts that punctuated the past 60,000 years (Lohmann and Svensson, 2022; McConnell et al., 2017), including dramatic millennial-scale cooling events (Abbott et al., 2021). This hints to a possible role of volcanic clusters in reversing global warming trends and triggering long-lasting natural modes of climate cooling.

This project aims at investigating the potential of clusters of strong volcanic eruptions to cause sustained cold events under pre-Holocene climate scenarios. The successful applicant will design and run transient climate model experiments using Earth system models that include atmospheric chemistry-aerosol-climate coupling, i.e. one or two of the following models: UKESM1, MPI-ESM1.2, and HadCM3. The simulations will be performed under a range of glacial boundary conditions to determine the cooling potential of volcanic clusters and assess short- and long-term memory of regional and global climatic variability. Particular attention will be paid to how volcanic cluster signals propagate into the subsurface ocean and the associated determinant processes, the ocean memory effects and the coupling between northward heat transport, Arctic sea ice and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Finally, the experiments will be evaluated using a wide network of proxy-climate data by comparing reconstructed and simulated spatial temperature and precipitation patterns.

Eligible candidates must have a PhD (or equivalent degree) in Climate Physics, Applied Mathematics, Earth Sciences or allied disciplines. A background in palaeoclimate modelling is desirable. They must be highly motivated and should have excellent time management, organisational and communication skills, and be able to work well as part of a team. The successful candidate will be based in Cambridge and work closely with Dr Francesco Muschitiello and an international network of collaborators, i.e. Dr Thomas Aubry (University of Exeter), Dr Peter Hopcroft (University of Birmingham), Dr Claudia Timmreck (Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology), Dr Davide Zanchettin (University of Venice). They will have the opportunity to participate in a wide range of activities within the Centre for Climate Repair and the Department of Geography, including the departmental ‘Climate and Environmental Dynamics’ research group, and reading groups and seminars across the University.
Tasks
Set-up and run of volcanic cluster climate model simulations; analysis of climate model output and proxy-model data comparison; production of academic publications; presenting findings at conferences and interacting with project partners and collaborators.
Requirements
Essential: Completed PhD in a relevant discipline, e.g. Climate Physics, Applied Mathematics, Earth Science.

Essential: A background in climate modelling and climate model simulations.
Desirable: modelling the climatic influence of volcanoes.

Desirable: Experience in palaeoclimate modelling and climate-proxy reconstructions.
Applications
To submit an application for this vacancy, please follow the instructions on this link www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/37978/
Application deadline
Further information
For further information, please contact Dr Francesco Muschitiello, fm476@cam.ac.uk (tel: 01223 333193).
Contact email
fm476@cam.ac.uk